Internet Summit/Raleigh: Content is still king

The Internet Summit is here in Raleigh, N.C., this week. Some of the biggest players in the business are talking for two days about, well, how there’s a ton of data out there. One of the big themes is if we don’t use what’s freely available, we’ll lose. In short, if we don’t use the growing list of tools to make online business easier JUST because we think that we’ve got the better cyber mouse trap, we’ll all lose.

Lulu CEO Bob Young (Courtesy: Tech Journal South)

“We don’t need breakthroughs to make [online business] a huge part of our economy,” said Bob Young, founder and CEO Lulu.com. “It already is a huge part of our economy.”

Young was part of a panel discussion, “The Future of the Web,” and one of a bevy of A-list folks from around the country who descended on the Triangle for the summit. He joined others, including Joe Gregorio, a software engineer in developer relations for Google, Rod Smith, vice president, Emerging Internet Technologies at IBM, and a host of others.

Young said that businesses shouldn’t make it hard on themselves. They should do the homework that leads them to the, oftentimes, free business solutions that will make their business grow. In fact, one question from the audience touched on net neutrality.

Young said that the first order of business is to educate Congress on the “whys” and “hows” of ensuring open source information. But, despite asserting that more breakthroughs aren’t the answer, he said that without a clear and open path that will help programmers keep up with the exploding amount of data in cyberspace, people, not just businesses, will suffer.

Young added that he runs his business by letting his designers lead him and not the other way around. He intimated that any new law of control is the wrong choice and that without the freedom to “rethink” the way the Web operates, people like his young designers won’t be able to help him – or anyone else, for that matter.

It’s king, but it has be good, too

Young also said we all suffer if the quality of content isn’t maintained. He said we’re raising a more literate population, thanks to the Web, with more people writing and reading. But, now more than ever, as content is still king, business needs to find the folks who can write well. With that “ton of data out there,” only well written content can ensure significance and relevance to the audience.

“You’re interacting with text,” he said.  “And we need to harness that [potential] by paying people to write good content.”

Now on to day 2 at the Summit!

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